3 DNS commands for testing your network

In our post today, we are going to look at the best 3 DNS commands that you can use for testing your network. You can use them to examine critical information such as your DNS records and the state of your network. Furthermore, it makes no difference whether you’re running Windows, macOS, or Linux. So, let’s clarify which DNS commands are the most frequent and explain a little more about them.

Nslookup command

One of the most commonly used DNS diagnostic commands is NSLookup. It has the advantage of being available on all of the major operating systems (OS). It allows you to view all types of DNS records. In addition, it also has a number of choices.

To see all of the accessible DNS records, use the NSLookup command. Write the following in the command line:

$ nslookup -type=any exampledomain.com

* Replace exampledomain.com with the domain name that you want to test.

It will display all of the accessible DNS records for the domain in question. If you wish to see a specific DNS record, change the type to NS, A, AAAA, MX, SOA, etc. You can input another domain name or IP address after the DNS type.

Dig command

On macOS, the dig command is one of the pre-installed DNS commands. You can rapidly install the command whether you’re using Linux or Windows. It’s a valuable and useful DNS troubleshooting tool. This command can display information about any DNS record type. You can also explore your nameservers, traceroute both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, and verify a specific port. Troubleshooting with the Dig command is simple and quick, and it’s well worth your time.

For example, if you want to see all the data for a specific domain, type in the command line:

$ dig exampledomain.com any 

* Replace exampledomain.com with the domain name that you want to test.

Simply substitute the domain name or IP address for the one you want to see. The Dig command is great since it gives you all of the information you need regarding the query you asked for. If you want a more specific result, you can use one of the several options provided by the Dig command.

Host command

The Host commands are fairly similar to the Dig commands in terms of functionality. As a result, you can use it to see the available DNS records and use it to troubleshoot DNS issues. You can also use many options to check an IP address or domain name, do a reverse lookup, discover the domain’s nameservers, or edit DNS queries. The Host command, like the Dig command, is built-in on Linux. As a result, you have complete freedom in selecting which one to utilize.

If you want to see all the available information about a domain, type the following command:

$ host -a exampledomain.com

* Replace exampledomain.com with the domain name that you want to test.

Conclusion

In conclusion, we can say that these DNS commands are really helpful for testing your network. They are easy and simple to use. Be applying the suggested commands whenever and however you wish. They will, in fact, offer you with the information you seek.

List of DNS terms that every administrator should know

Here’s a quick rundown of the most useful DNS terms. Learning the complex structure of the Domain Name System as a beginner can be extremely frustrating. But, if we start explaining, everything will become much more straightforward and make more sense.

Domain Name System (DNS)

The Domain Name System, or DNS, is a critical component of the Internet. It’s a global naming database that converts internet domain names to IP addresses (Internet Protocol). DNS is a multi-level hierarchical system that is decentralized. Humans no longer need to remember long and complicated numbers (for example, 213.45.178.32) in order to access and explore every website thanks to this technology. Instead, visitors can type the domain name directly into their browser and go to their selected web page.

Dynamic DNS

Dynamic DNS is the second term in our list of DNS terms. Dynamic DNS (DDNS) has the advantage of automatically updating and changing the host’s IP address.

The A or AAAA DNS entries in classical DNS connect the domain name to the IP address. Dynamic DNS ensures that the user may still access the domain name even if the IP address is changed by the ISP. It is a really easy-to-use solution that also happens to be quite helpful.

Domain name

Another really important term is the domain name. It is a line of text used to map an IP address. We use it to visit websites by writing memorable and straightforward names rather than their numerical addresses, known as IP addresses. For example, instead of 213.45.178.32, we type example4domain.net. So the domain name here is example4domain.net.

IP address

The Internet Protocol (IP) uses an identifier called an IP address to name hosts on the Internet. IANA creates and assigns each IP address, which is completely unique. Furthermore, they are a prerequisite for devices to communicate and exchange information over a network. Today we divide the IP addresses into two categories: IPv4 and IPv6.

Example for IPv4 – 213.45.178.32
Example for IPv6 – 50f1:dc4:0:0:0:ffff:d52d:b220

DNS records

Let’s continue with the next term – the DNS records. They are text files that contain information about the Domain Name System. Every domain has a different amount and variety of DNS records. In addition, they represent the domain’s many entities and settings. For example, the most popular records are – SOA, A, PTR, MX, etc.

DNS query

The process of finding the IP address (an A record or an AAAA record) or different DNS records of a domain we known it as a DNS query. For example, when a customer requests information, it creates a DNS query.

DNS server

And the last important term on our list is the DNS servers. They are split into two categories: authoritative name servers and recursive name servers.

  • Authoritative name servers keep track of a particular zone’s zone file. Furthermore, they are the only ones who can respond to DNS queries. The root server, TLD server, and authoritative name server for a certain domain are examples of such servers.
  • The objective of recursive name servers is to collect the DNS query from the user and then search for the required information. To do so, these servers pass through a series of servers until they get the solution. Consider them to be the intermediary between users and authoritative name servers.

Conclusion

DNS is a multi-component system that aims to make the Internet user experience more pleasant. To sum up, you can now confidently state that you are conversant with the basic DNS terms. They are the basis upon which everything else is built.